Do you need to surrender your dachshund?

Having to make the hard decision to surrender your dog is very emotional. CCDR understands situations happen and lifestyes change and sadly the family pet has to be re-homed but, before you do, please ask yourself these questions.

Did you acquire him as a puppy from a breeder?
If so, have you contacted that person? If he or she is at all reputable, you would have signed a contract at the time you purchased your puppy, stipulating that the dog should be returned if you decide to no longer keep him. If you do not want to keep your dog, contact your breeder first.


Did you acquire your Dog from a Rescue Organization?
If so, have you contacted that rescue organization? Most likely, as in the case of CCDR, you would have signed a contract at the time you adopted your dog, stipulating that the dog must be returned to them if you decide to no longer keep him or her for any reason.


Is there a new baby in the family?
Are you aware that most dogs are fantastic family pets? If you can take care of your new little human baby, you can take care of a dog. Below are some articles to help you ease the transition:

Introduce you dog to your new baby by Ceasar Milan

Introducing your dog to your new baby by the ASPCA

The Safety Guide to Children and Dogs by Victoria Stillwell


Moving?
There are plenty of apartments, townhouses, condos and hotels that accept small, medium and large breeds of dog. While you may have to put down a pet deposit, ask if you may spread your deposit out over multiple months as part of your rent.  Here is a list of rentals that allow pets:

People With Pets - http://www.peoplewithpets.com/

http://www.rent.com/pet-friendly-apartments

http://www.apartmentlist.com/


You feel you don’t have enough time for your dog?
Dogs don't have the same sense of time as people do so to a dog, five hours is the same as five minutes. They will greet you the same and, most likely will just sleep during the time period you are gone. Experts in the animal field agree that a dog requires a mere 15 minutes of one-on-one time with his owner per day to be happy, healthy, and well-adjusted! That could be simply spent laying in bed at night watching TV together, playing ball in the backyard for 15 minutes while dinner is cooking, or going for a walk or jog! Surely you can spare 15 minutes per day. A dog that has been living with a family for it's entire life would much rather stay with the person or family it loves, even with reduced one-on-one time than have to go to a new home where there is a lot of readjustment, and sometimes less attention. But, if you feel you are having to leave your dog for unusually long periods of time every day, then you are thinking what is fair and best for your dog and finding a home where the dog gets more attention may be the kinder thing to do for your dog. Remember though, pets reduce personal stress and can add years to your life so if it's possible, keep your dog and look for a few minutes during the day to spend with them.


Have you considered asking a neighbor or a relative if they would help you with your dog by either letting the dog out each day while you are gone or whether they would like to have them for their own (providing they would be a good owner of course?)

Often times reaching out to a neighbor or a family member isn't thought of but it is a possibility. You may never know, you're neighbor may love your dog and be very happy to take them or, offer to have them over during the day while you are away. Ask your relatives as well, but please make sure whoever you ask or give your dog to, they are a responsible pet owner and will give your dog the best care possible.


Are there behavioral issues?

Is your dog having trouble getting along with other animals in the household or are there other behavioral issues that have led to the decision to give up your dog? Is your dog altered? Often times behavior issues are solved when the dog is altered. If you need assistance with a low cost spay neuter program, visit the resource page or visit these sites: 

Low cost spay/neuter locations - This is a database kept by the ASPCA. Put in your zip code and miles and the low cost options come up. 

SPAY USA - Over 1500 participating clinics to help with altering your pet 

Friends of Animals - Another site that has a database of clinics that offer low cost spay/neuter certificates


Would you be willing to do a few things that would help your dog? It’s never too late to enroll him in obedience school. It’s fun and it teaches your dog routine so they know what to expect. This helps towards behavior training and respect, often time changing the behavior of your dog. If there is true aggression (repeated aggression) towards a specific dog in the family (if you have another dog) sometimes it is necessary to re-home one of the dogs. 

Has you dog started behavior changes due to a change in it's environment? Have you moved, had someone move in with you, changed normal routines, had a change in your schedule, brought another dog in, just to name a few? If you can identify what is different to have caused the behavior change, see if you can return things to normal. Hopefully you can find the trigger and make the adjustments where life returns to "normal."

Here is a link to the Michigan Humane Society where they have a number of articles that may help with behavior issues. 

http://www.michiganhumane.org/site/PageServer?pagename=behavior_dogs


Experiencing financial issues?

All to often a pet needs veterinary care that may be more than a family can absorb. It can be a personal struggle on how to cover expensive vetting from treatments to surgery. There are organizations that you can reach out to for help. Each organization will have specific guidelines that you may be required to follow to qualify, but they are worth looking in to in hopes to help your plight. There are links on the resource page suggesting a number of possibilities of sites that may be of help to you financially.

The following groups exist to assist people who truly want to keep their pets, but are experiencing financial difficulties. They may be able to help you.

Red Rover Relief Grants http://www.uan.org/index.cfm?navid=161

Humane Society http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_pet.html


For families that are experiencing financial hardship:

American Animal Hospital Association http://www.aahahelpingpets.org

Angels 4 Animals www.angels4animals.org


A credit card company for health care:

Care Credit www.carecredit.com


For financially strapped families:

IMOM http://www.imom.org


Help owners that need  urgent veterinary care, emergency vet visits or expensive surgery:

The pet fund http://thepetfund.com/


Assistance for caretakers of disabled pets:

HandicappedPets.com http://www.handicappedpets.com/Articles/help/


Pet Food stamps Aid for Struggling Owners

http://www.petfoodstamps.org/aboutus/ - To become a member of Pet Food Stamps you must be receiving some type of Public Assistance such as: Food Stamps, Welfare or Social Security (if this is your only form of income and places you under the Federal poverty level for income). There is an application process and due to the extreme requests, it may take awhile.


After careful consideration to the information above, if you still feel you must surrender your dog, please go to the representative page and look for a member who may be close to you. Contact them and ask if they are able to help you  and whether they have room to bring your dog in to CCDR. If they are, they will ask you to be honest about why you are having to give up your dog and will ask for specific reason you are doing so, including the issues (if there are any) with your dog's temperament. You will be asked to answer basic questions on behavior, personality traits, health and veterinary care as well as send them a picture. If the member can help you, you will have to supply all current vetting information and sign a surrender form that will give CCDR legal ability to bring your dog into our program and put them up for adoption. Please keep in mind, once you relinquish your dog, you will no longer have any contact with it or know where they have been placed. It is a heart wrenching decision to make but if you feel you are doing in the best interest of the dog, we will be here to help you.